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Author Topic: Polyester Resin  (Read 71 times)

Chris Brown

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Polyester Resin
« on: 13 June 2019, 03:01:15 pm »
Some information on polyester resin that those who haven't used it much might find useful.

There are two types of catalyst used with polyester resin, the paste type commonly supplied with the likes of Isopon, and the liquid (MEKP) usually used industrially.

They are not interchangeable, as the accelerator dissolved in the resin is specific to the catalyst.

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Steve Cole

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Re: Polyester Resin
« Reply #1 on: 15 June 2019, 08:45:41 am »
Correct Chris. If anyone has any questions regarding fibreglass and polyester resin then just post here. I have been using on a daily basis for the last 40 years 😳🤖

Chris Brown

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Re: Polyester Resin
« Reply #2 on: 15 June 2019, 09:13:09 pm »
I should hope so, I've been working with polyester resin for much the same length of time as you.

RhysN

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Re: Polyester Resin
« Reply #3 on: 16 June 2019, 10:29:56 am »
Is this turning into a contest? :),
1976 was the start of my career with composites! At least I can say I was able to move away from it somewhat after the phase of my life churning out products 12 hours a day. Now it's just a hobby (or source of extra income occasionally)

TheGiantTribble

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Re: Polyester Resin
« Reply #4 on: 16 June 2019, 05:23:51 pm »
I will just add to all the above information. If you have any breathing problems or difficulties (asthma, COPD etc.), use Epoxy resin rather than Polyester, far less fumes.
It's also a bit stronger, and doesn't attack polystyrene :-) It is however also dearer :-(

RhysN

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Re: Polyester Resin
« Reply #5 on: 16 June 2019, 09:15:21 pm »
Epoxy isn't harmless either, and a whole lot more difficult if you insist on using CSM, at least polyester goes hard in 20 minutes or so! Epoxy poisoning is evil and will stay with you for the rest of your life.
In the end, none of this stuff is harmless, take the appropriate precautions and stay safe, please.

Slack Alice

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Re: Polyester Resin
« Reply #6 on: 16 June 2019, 09:22:56 pm »
Right guys, very soon I’m going to have to create a wooden body. The only ‘resin’ I have is what comes with CSM in a repair kit. I have a 1 litre pot and it came with red paste hardener in a tube. I assume this is polyester?
What can I get away with for gluing the tub together?

TheGiantTribble

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Re: Polyester Resin
« Reply #7 on: 16 June 2019, 10:12:01 pm »
Re gluing the tub, better if you can screw/clamp also well as glue, and my monologue used
Evo Stick water proof wood glue...available various sizes, in a blue container.
The green Evo Stick wood glue is not water proof, and the price difference is not great enough
to bother with the green imho.

RhysN...kindly re read what I put and tell me which bit is incorrect? At what point did I say Epoxy was harmless? For your information
one wiff of polyester I stop breathing, when I received my kit car body I had to wait a
couple of weeks with it in the open air, before I could go near it without a reaction.

This is the tech forum for information, both polyester and epoxy can be made to go off at different rates from a matter of minutes
to several hours, actually days but that was an experiment far outside the manufacturers data.




RhysN

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Re: Polyester Resin
« Reply #8 on: 17 June 2019, 03:44:48 am »
Giant Tribble, nothing you have said is incorrect. You didn't say epoxy was harmless. You have a reaction to polyester, that is not overly uncommon. I have had people I know who suffer very badly (almost immediately) with epoxy, and others who are OK with both, but vinylester gets them.
I'm lucky (so far) with all in that I haven't had a reaction to any.
What I said was please be safe, much better to take all precautions no matter which you use.

My wooden tubs I have used epoxy (West system always so far), although I have experimented with Evo Stik "Sticks like" and so far it seems OK, certainly did a great job sticking the alloy sheet over the ply tub on Kim. I did some of my own boil tests to check, the ply broke down before the glue. As I haven't had any long term experience with some of the commercial glues here in UK I can only speak of that which I know. I did have a sales rep try to convince me about the foaming type glues (in his case one of the Gorilla products) my own tests had that fail in a short time, so for me they are a no.

Polyester can be made to go off in a long (or short) cure time, the industry background indicates that 20 minutes is a target for effective strength in ambient temperature range of the mid teens. UV light is an effective method of firing it off if it's slow, ie put it in the sun, or cover the whole thing and get the heat elevated with a heat source NOT OPEN ELEMENTS. Products similar to what Chris makes, which I did for years at a far less quality than Adrian does all went in a large hot box heated by 2 40 watt bulbs to make sure of a cure.

Epoxy has recommended hardener to resin ratios, moving too far away from them either way makes the resin less than optimum. In this country most epoxy is sold with "fast" hardener as standard because of lower temperatures. It's not considered wise to use less to slow the cure, nor more to speed it up.
If I am laminating I prefer the vinylester, has cure times like polyester and elevated strengths closer to epoxy, sort of best of both worlds, but it still doesn't like styrene foam a lot for the carved
Yes Slack Alice, what you have is polyester. The hardener paste you have is what Chris refers to in post that started this. Personally I would not use that to stick your tub together, I have never had lasting success in sticking wood with polyester, but others have told me they have. Again, personal opinion I would not use the CSM for that task either

Chris Brown

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Re: Polyester Resin
« Reply #9 on: 17 June 2019, 11:39:33 am »
I've used the foaming polyurethane glue with success, BUT it needs to be used like any other glue. The joint fits need to be close, and clamped or screwed, if it's allowed to foam within the joint it'll fail in short order. As far as I'm concerned it has no advantages over waterproof PVA, and the big disadvantage of a short shelf life once it's opened.